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What Is The Average Weight Of A Fully Grown Teacup Chihuahua?

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Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Teacup Chihuahua is becoming popular nowadays due to the fact that Paris Hilton, a popular actress owns one. The name was derived from those that actually sell them because of its size that is smaller than a regular Chihuahua. These dogs are very much lively and their sizes make them crave for more attention. A full grown Teacup Chihuahua average weight is between two – six lbs. Its height only reaches up to 9 inches that makes them a portable pet.
gennau`\/. nealy Profile
About 2.5 pounds
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
The will weigh around five pound.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
There is no "teacup" Chihuahua, but it is a term usually given to Chihuahua's who are under 3 pounds.
Jodi Something Profile
Jodi Something answered
There is no such thing as a teacup Chihuahua. A Chihuahua is the smallest breed already. So you want one in the normal range or you will probably have a lot of medical concerns and you can not leave them as long as a normal size dog. Teacup is just a term puppy mills and questionable breeders make up. Research it online and you will see.
V D Profile
V D answered
A true Chihuahua will not get over six pounds. This is given the understanding that you are feeding it a healthy diet of DOG food not People food. And all this stuff about tea cups....ask any vet, there is No Such Thing. There Are Very Tiny Chihuahuas , and they are called tea cups by their owners. But the truth of the matter is that there is NO Breed that is specifically a tea cup. They are just plain not telling you the truth if they are telling you that they are selling you a tea cup.
KR- myopinions Profile
KR- myopinions answered
There isn't any such thing as teacup in any breed. A Chihuahua is still considered a Chihuahua whether it weighs 2 pounds or 12+ pounds. There are smaller chihuahua's and larger chihuahua's and the smaller they are the more health issues are associated along with additional care and a much shorter life span. The only distinction in the breed is long coat or smooth coat. Use of the word or similar terms made up for sales purposes by a seller is considered to be a big red flag for several reasons. Here is the link to the breed parent club so you can learn more about the breed and also their 'teacup' statement.
www.chihuahuaclubofamerica.com www.chihuahuaclubofamerica.com www.dogfoodanalysis.com
KR- myopinions Profile
KR- myopinions answered
There isn't any such thing. The terms such as teacup, pocket, micro and whatever else they come up with next do not actually exist as classifications. If you have a 2 pound chihuahua you have a two pound chihuahua, if you have a 12 pound chihuahua you have a 12 pound chihuahua (or yorkie, or Maltese or whatever else for that matter).   Here's what some of the breed clubs (who determine and set the AKC standard which means the IDEAL example of that breed here in the USA have to say about those terms:  Chihuahua:   www.chihuahuaclubofamerica.com    Shih-Tzu:   www.americanshihtzuclub.org    Yorkshire terrier (yorkie):   www.ytca.org  (They have just added some definitive DQ's concerning color I believe as well)    Maltese: At the bottom of the page under Maltese Myths www.americanmaltese.org    Poodle:   www.poodleclubofamerica.com    The problem (or A problem) with buying a puppy from someone who uses those terms to describe their puppies (and in some breeds like the bulldog it is mini) is that they are probably either dishonest or they are not knowledgeable enough about their breed (and possibly breeding though they may have good intentions) if they don't even know that's a made up sales tactic. Both scenarios can contribute to an unhealthy puppy and neither of those is likely to be able or willing to properly educate you on the negatives, risks, and additional care that the really tiny ones need. While a breeder may have smaller dogs the ones you want to buy from NEVER use those terms and will adamantly tell you they don't exist while explaining the extra care, health problems, and usually shorter life span of their pup that is likely to be much smaller than the average (among other distinctions).

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