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Can Describe Florida Black Snake With Orange Ring Around The Neck?

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Matthew Porter Profile
Matthew Porter answered
Southern Ring-neck snakes have slate grey bodies, with a bright yellow to red underbelly, sometimes dotted with black spots. Their distinguishing feature is the ring of orange or yellow right behind their heads. If the ring around the neck is barely visible, it is a Key Ring-neck snake (Diadophus punctatus acricus), which is found in the lower Florida Keys.

If the ring is distinct and broken, it is a Southern Ring-neck snake (Diadophus punctatus punctatus), found more in the north of Florida, and into southern Alabama. If the ring is distinct and complete, but there are no markings on the underbelly, it is a Northern Ring-neck snake (Diadophus punctatus edwardis), which inhabits the mountains in the north of America, leading into Canada, although it’s not found above higher than 2200m elevation.

Ring-neck snakes can also be identified by their defensive stance when threatened. When alarmed, they coil their tails into a corkscrew to exposure their vivid underbelly. They are small snakes normally between 10 and 15 inches long and are non-venomous. When handled, they will rarely bite, but may release a foul-smelling odor. They are woodland reptiles so live in warm, dark places, such as under logs, or between mossy rocks. When hot, they tend to make a hole and bury themselves in the ground, or are often found hiding behind the bark of a rotting tree. Their diet therefore consists of small earthworms, slugs, frogs, salamanders, and smaller snakes.

Their main method of securing their prey is constriction, as they do not have a dedicated venom gland at the front of the mouth. Ring-neck snakes reproduce by laying eggs, in moist areas, such as inside or under rotting logs. Sometimes, the same nesting site will be used communally by several females. The newborn snakes are 3-4 inches long.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Black on top, ting around neck and orange to red belly color. This harmless snake is commonly called "Florida Ringnecked Snake" and is 'officially' named Diadophis punctatus punctatus. I have handled many and never had a single one attempt to bite. They are beneficial and will eat a number of insect pests around the home. They can be safely picked up (use a towel if frightened) and placed outdoors if they manage to enter your home. I have seen them living in 2 gallon flower pots which may explain how some manage to get into upstairs apartments.
matt forman Profile
matt forman answered
That would be a harmless ringneck snake you could guess why it's called that. They are very timid and almost never bite. Depending on the specimen it is anywhere from 2 inches to 1 foot at largest. The only defenses that the ringneck snake has is playing dead, rolling over showing its bright orange/red colors (witch are supposed to imitate the venomous coral sake) and giving off a fowl stench that will stay on your hand for hours. There main diet is lizards along with small frogs or even insects. If you are planning to take one captive remember to keep the exhibit in a cool area don't even think about sunning them while in cage as the glass would heat the suns rays and kill the snake (believe me I've done it before). You can keep them captive for quit a while. I have kept one for almost three years until sadly it died of a disease. Google the snake they are really pretty cool.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Southern Ringneck Snakes, not venomous, not aggressive, rarely grow more than 8-12 inches the record is 18 inches long & more common at about 5 inches.
www.flmnh.ufl.edu
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
I find them in my pool in south florida all the time. Skinny things.
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Anonymous answered
Depending on where you live it is probably a type of ringneck snake. Check the following sites for details:

www.umass.edu target="_blank" class="qa" rel="external">www.uga.edu
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
I just found a baby snake with this description. I found more info about it at this site:  www.flmnh.ufl.edu can have other color rings besides orange. I have never seen one of these before, so I was kind of freaked out at first thinking it was poisonous. It appears they are common in Florida and harmless.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
ITs called a Florida Ring Neck they are very harmless and rarely ever bite. If they do bite their teeth are too small to break the skin.
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Anonymous answered
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