What Do I Do About My Dog Who Has A Fatty Tumor On His Chest?

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Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
If this lipoma (benign fatty tumor) is causing respiratory difficulties or problems with mobility it needs to be removed.  Age is not a disease--many geriatric pets undergo anesthesia regularly.  Fatty tumors do not carry a poorer prognosis related to anesthesia than other tumors.  If this lipoma is affecting your dog's quality of life then it should be removed.
Precautions should be taken by your veterinarian to make anesthesia as risk free as possible.  This starts with pre-anesthetic bloodwork to make sure your dog's liver, kidney, and other organs are functioning well and can handle anesthesia.  Many of the drugs we use for anesthesia are broken down in the liver and sent out of the body by the kidney.  Your dog should have an intravenous catheter during the procedure and intravenous fluids.  The catheter allows immediate access if a problem were to arise.  The fluids maintain blood pressure and makes recovery faster and easier.  Different medications can be used in older pets and at lower doses.  Your dog should have it's heart rate, blood pressure, temperature, and oxygen saturation monitored while under anesthesia.  Appropriate monitoring helps us know the exact status of your dog while under anesthesia.  This last week I removed a large (almost 2 pound) tumor from a 14 year old dog and now that dog is able to run around the park.  With all this said you need to comfortable with anesthesia and this process.
Lipomas cannot be drained--they are composed of fat cells.  Cysts can be drained.
I would also make sure this breathing difficulty is not related to a primary problem with the lungs.  It may be related to compression/pressure from the lipoma but it is important to rule out other causes before anesthesia and surgery. 
Talk to your veterinarian about your concerns.  You can also always get a second opinion on your dog's case and a health assessment for surgery.
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Anonymous
Anonymous commented
Hello,My 11y/o female beagle underwent surgery today to remove what we thought was a lipoma(fatty tumor). The 'lipoma' was located on her belly and causing her to pant a lot and she would only eat at night--we feed her twice a day.
Dr. Queller called me to tell me that it was very vascular and does not apear to be a lipoma after all. He said it had invaded the muscle near her diaphram and rib cage and he removed all he could get without causing further harm. I am in tears as I type this because it is more than likely our 'lipoma' is actually a cancerous tumor and my poor baby will not be here too much longer. PLEASE HAVE THE SURGERY NOW!!!!!! DO NOT WAIT!!!!! I cannot express the pain I am feeling and the guilt for 'waiting and seeing'. Do not make the same mistake I made.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Well if it was my dog I would get a second opinion if its causing him breathing problems. Is there anything that can be drained out for the tumor or maybe a medicine that help shrink the tumor a steroid or something.
Johnny Campbell Profile
Johnny Campbell answered
Oh my god guys at The bottom read the question he already said he took it to the vet. Stupids.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Take it to another vet that can help it because it can be fixed
jade duncton Profile
jade duncton answered
You take it to the vets
Tiffany Profile
Tiffany answered
I think you need to see another vet asap especially if your dog can't breathe correctly.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
My dog has fatty tumors all over and I know that by themselves they are not dangerous.  But if your dog is having breathing problems caused by the tumor, maybe it could be drained.  A dog your age is a bit old to be having surgery, and your vet may have been right to advise against it, but it wouldn't hurt to ask if there's anything else that can be done, or see another vet for another opinion.
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Anonymous
Anonymous commented
If the dog breathes fine during the day, I would do nothing. My black lab had a fatty tumor on her chest that grew to the size of a soccer ball in 6 years. It did not phaise her, she was healthy ,happy and productive. She would lay on it all the time, that would cause her to breathe heavier. She died at 13 1\2. The fatty tumor never took her.
SARAH TELFORD Profile
SARAH TELFORD answered
Ask another vet or if you don't want him to suffer, well you know what I'm going to say. You could put him to rest? You that seems like a nice way to say it.

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