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This Bug Has Pinchers On Front , Segmented Body And Very Flexible Tail And Has Six Legs, What Is It?

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James FitzGerald Profile
This is most likely a lacewing larvae insect which believe it or not they can be extremely beneficial to the garden. They eat all sorts of small things that are creeping and crawling around in your garden including thrips, red spider mites, small caterpillar eggs and mealy bugs.

The larvae can be introduced in fruit and vegetable crops or even in ornamental plants. The larvae are pretty tiny, measuring  approximately just 0.8 mm. They are extremely adapt at combating aphid infestations, each insect is capable of consuming up to 50 aphids per day. If you would like to use the insects to combact your aphid problem, follow these steps:

As the larvae cannot fly, they need to be able to reach their prey and hence the larvae should therefore be placed near the aphids. The larvae are able to move a great distance for something so small, amassing up 4-5 km before they even grow into fully fledged adults. The adult lacewing lays approximately 20 eggs every day with the time it takes to get from egg to adult takes about 30 days normally.

Ants protect aphids, and fight with the lacewings. Lacewings are common, capable of flight and measure around 12 - 15 mm with green bodies and delicate green lacy wings which lie folded on their back when they are stationary.

The adult's diet mainly consists of honey, pollen, and nectar, which they need to reproduce. They are known as the 'aphid lion' and as a single insect can consume 100-600 aphids in its lifetime. Adults tend to hibernate over winter, and mate during the summer months.

The first larvae to emerge are brown in appearance and about 4mm long, with sharp nipping claws at the front whereas the more mature older larvae are paler, about 13 mm long, with bristles on their back.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Unlike everyone else who didn't see it, or anything like it. I have seen one, and refused to let it go until I found out what it was. I found out that they're lacewing larvae, and they're very beneficial to your garden. The colour seems to vary greatly in them
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
I'm wonder the same thing, I found a very similar sounding bug....
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Anonymous answered
It sounds like an earwig. They like to hide in dark tiny crevasse...and are sneaky.
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Anonymous answered
I have also found one of these it was about1 1/2 " the tail came up like a scorpians. When I went to the Natural History museum I found one in the insect room. It was years ago so I can't remember the latin name but it was called The devil's stagecoach. I have tried to find one on the web but had no luck. It was not a friendly looking bug.     Jan
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Anonymous answered
I just found one in my kitchen, kind of similar and I looked it up because I couldnt let it go until I knew. The photo that came almost close to what I found was a bug called the 'devil's coach horse' surprisingly it is a type of beetle. The bug I found looked to me like an earwig and a centipede got together and procreated. Hope it helps also Scorpions have eight legs, and earwigs are smaller and with brown to black bodies!!!!
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Anonymous answered
I came accross a "spider" very similar. Brown about 1 1/4" long with it's leg span, 5 on each side.Where fangs usually go there were 4 pinchers/pincers.Very similar to the pinchers on earwigs but a pair !?! Like
()()   Have taken some pictures of it however unavailable atm. I've searched now for nearly 2 hours for this.All to same conclusion of guesses of all the above but when you see picture, You'll all trip out. As it fled from my fatal blow it reminded me of how those Aliens from that movie moved
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Anonymous answered
Scorpion
thanked the writer.
Ashley
Ashley commented
I found a very similar sounding insect. It's tail doesn't actually come up like a scorpion. It's almost like a cross between a scorpion and maybe an earwig. It was VERY fast and moved like a snake. In an 'S' shape. It is definitely not a lacewing larvae. I also captured it to find out what the heck it is! Please keep posting any ideas!!
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Anonymous answered
I found one that seems similar to your description. One set of pinchers on the front, yellowish markings on sides, about 1/3 inch in total length. Uses it's tail in walking, has a very painful, but not long lasting bite. Looks like Something from a star trek movie
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Anonymous answered
We found the same type bug. However, it is not a lacewing larvae. They don't look the same. Anyone know what it is?
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Anonymous answered
Pretty sure you're describing a grub worm, which is beetle larvae.  You can do an image search on bing.com to be sure.

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